School of Media and Communication

Capitalism, Culture and the Media

Conference Programme

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In this section:

DAY 1 – Monday 7 September 2015

09.00 – 10.00 REGISTRATION
Clothworkers’ Centenary Concert Hall Lobby

10.00 – 11.15

Plenary One: Capitalism, Culture and the Media

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary Concert Hall
Chair: Kate Oakley, University of Leeds

Welcome and introductory remarks
David Hesmondhalgh, University of Leeds
Capitalism, culture and media: Introducing the conference

Keynote 1
Bev Skeggs, Goldsmiths, University of London
Experimenting with personhood: Capital’s new lines of flight

Keynote 2
Justin Lewis, Cardiff University
Media, knowledge, quality of life and cultural diversity

11.15 – 11.30 Tea/Coffee break

11.30 – 13.00

Panels 1

PANEL 1.1 ‘DOING’ DIVERSITY AND PERFORMING INTERSECTING INEQUALITIES: HOW THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES ARE STRATIFIED, WHY IT MATTERS AND WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT IT

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT1
Chair: Kate Oakley, University of Leeds

  1. ’They said talk more “black”….like you haven’t got a degree’: Inequality, exclusion and the lived experiences of becoming cultural workers
    Kim Allen, University of Leeds
  2. The rationalising/racialising logic of capital in the culturally diverse arts
    Anamik Saha, Goldsmiths, University of London
  3. ‘It’s not a meritocracy’: On the social stratification of acting
    Sam Friedman, London School of Economics
    Dave O’Brien, Goldsmiths, University of London

PANEL 1.2

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT2
Chair: Jeremy Vachet, University of Leeds

  1. Precarious experience denied?
    Mikko Jakonen, University of Jyväskylä
  2. A Marxist recovery of the popular-press left: the books of Naomi Klein and Jeremy Scahill
    Dugan Nichols, Simon Fraser University
  3. Entrepreneurial squatting projects: the case-study of the self-managed theatre Embros
    Antigoni Papageorgiou, University of Leeds
  4. Media commodities against status quo: contradictions of the Czech alternative media
    Jan Miessler, Hong Kong Baptist University

PANEL 1.3

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT3
Chair: Chris Paterson, University of Leeds

  1. ”The final rip off”: Monty Python’s parodies of market economy as marketing of comedy
    Rami Mähkä, University of Turku
  2. Incredible India? A postcolonial critique of ‘successful’ nation branding
    Lee Edwards, University of Leeds
    Anandi Ramamurthy, Sheffield Hallam University
  3. Journalistic Twitter branding in the neoliberal labor market
    Jenny Wiik, University of Gothenburg
    Ulrika Hedman, University of Gothenburg
  4. Reimagining intimacy, love and entrepreneurial selves: Popular print culture in post-apartheid South Africa
    Sonia Narunsky-Laden, University of Johannesburg

PANEL 1.4

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT4
Chair: Luca Antoniazzi, University of Leeds

  1. The political paradox of selective moralization: The German war reparations and the Greek debt
    Spyros Bakas, Justus-Liebig Universität Gießen
  2. Jayne Anne Phillips, Lark and Termite: or, finance capital and the unreturnable body of militarized labour
    Richard Godden, University of California, Irvine
  3. Sentiment or emotions? How news media coverage drive stock market prices in the Netherlands
    Nadine Strauß, University of Amsteram
    Rens Vliegenthart University of Amsterdam
    Piet Verhoeven, University of Amsterdam
  4. Bubbles in the symbolic markets of late capitalist society
    Peter Csigó, University of Budapest

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch

14.00 – 15.30

Panels 2

PANEL 2.1

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT1
Chair: David Lee, University of Leeds

  1. “I wanted them to present a positive image of my neighbourhood”: Reality TV, class-making & agency
    Nicole P. de Vette, Erasmus University Rotterdam
  2. Representations of class in the media, why bother? A review of existing research and suggestions for a way forward
    Peter Jakobsson, Södertörn University
    Fredrik Stiernstedt, Jönköping University
  3. Poverty and the media: Challenging popular and political rhetoric about poverty
    Ruth Patrick, University of Leeds
    Tracy Shildrick, University of Leeds
  4. The politics of hyperbole on ‘Geordie Shore’: Class, gender, youth and excess
    Helen Wood, University of Leicester

PANEL 2.2

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT2
Chair: Anna Zoellner, University of Leeds

  1. (Re)styling ethical consumers: Sustainable fashion in contemporary consumer capitalism
    Johanna Arnesson, University of Gothenburg
  2. Understanding the value in creative, cultural capitalism: a Cape Breton music festival case study
    Sherry Finney, Cape Breton University
    Marcia Ostashewski, Cape Breton University
  3. Media labour and the extended commodification of the life-world
    Göran Bolin, Sӧdertӧrn University
  4. Product imitations on the internet as empowerment for students of poor family background in China?
    Marius Meinhof, University of Bielefeld

PANEL 2.3

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT3
Chair: Giles Moss, University of Leeds

  1. Critical political economy of media and critical theory. Critical epistemology of a complicated heritage
    Christophe Magis, Université Paris 8 Vincennes à St-Denis Cemti
  2. Critical political economy of communications now
    Jonathan Hardy, University of East London
  3. The rediscovery of ideology once more? Ideology critique in the new era of minimal effects
    Justin Schlosberg, Birkbeck, University of London
  4. Media and the promotion of capitalist-orientated representations
    Jean-Baptiste Comby, Université Paris 2
    Katharina Niemeyer, Université Paris 2

PANEL 2.4

Venue: Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT4
Chair: Lee Edwards, University of Leeds

  1. Capitalism, profanities, meaning
    Heidi Elmgren, University of Jyväskylä
  2. The transformations of knowledge work within affective capitalism: towards a theory of the reputation economy
    Alessandro Gandini, Middlesex University
  3. Cognitive capitalism, media, city: Towards a new dialectical materialism?
    Dafni Mangalousi, University of Leicester
  4. Black Capital: the (post)racial logics of neoliberalism
    Ashwani Sharma, University of East London

15.30 – 15.45 Tea/Coffee break

15.45 – 17.15

Panels 3

PANEL 3.1

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT1
Chair: David Lee, University of Leeds

  1. “It’s a dirty job, but someone’s gotta do it”: Mediated work since the crisis
    Jiska Engelbert, Erasmus University Rotterdam
  2. “This is the future of work”: The ambivalence of co-working spaces in contemporary capitalism
    Nicole Cohen, University of Toronto Mississauga
    Greig de Peuter, Wilfrid Laurier University
  3. Made in Dagenham: Gender struggles and industrial action as entertainment
    Ruth Adams, King’s College London
  4. Creative labour and the moral economy of the gift
    Barry King, Auckland University of Technology

PANEL 3.2

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT2
Chair: Ellis Jones, University of Leeds

  1. Beats and tweets: Musicians’ use of social media in the digital music industry
    Jo Haynes, University of Bristol
    Lee Marshall, University of Bristol
  2. Labor behind the drama: Class divisions and precarity in Turkish soap opera industry
    Ergin Bulut, Koc University
  3. Multiple identities of media labourers and experiences of creative autonomy: an empirical investigation from a tv programme producer’s perspective in South Korea
    Chairin An, University of Warwick
  4. Mainstream indie – independent game development
    Anna Ozimek, University of Leeds

PANEL 3.3 THE CULTURAL AND POLITICAL ECONOMY OF MEMORY

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT3
Chair: Mark Egan, University of York

  1. Iconomy and memory: On remembering as digital, civic and corporate currency in Brazil and the UK at a time of protest
    Joanne Garde-Hansen, University of Warwick
  2. On mnemonic labour
    Matthew Allen, University of Leicester
  3. Grusin’s premeditation and the pre-fabrication of future memories: the curious case of Islamic State
    Athina Karatzogianni, University of Leicester

PANEL 3.4 CULTURAL RESISTANCE IN CULTURE-BASED CAPITALIST ECONOMY 1. ARTISTS, RADICAL ARTISTIC PRACTICE AND ANTI-CAPITALIST THOUGHT IN AND AGAINST THE CREATIVE CLASS

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT4
Chair: Liz Sterling, Leeds Beckett University

  1. Education of art, art for education: Radicality in education as an artistic practice
    Nils Norman, Royal Danish Academy of Art and Design
  2. To have and to need
    Presentation by artist collective Haben und Brauchen, represented by Heimo Lattner and Annette Maechtel
  3. In the aftermath of the golden age of the squatting movement in Geneva
    Stefan Press, architect based in Geneva and Berlin

17.15 – 17.30 Tea / Coffee break

17.30 – 18.50

Plenary Two: Capitalism, Culture and the Media

INTERNATIONAL DIMENSIONS

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary Concert Hall
Chair: David Hesmondhalgh, University of Leeds

Keynote 3
Shakuntala Banaji, London School of Economics
Conformist agency and resourceful conservation: Working children and media in India

Keynote 4
Jason Cabañes, University of Leeds
Mediating migrant imaginaries at the edges of capitalism

Keynote 5
Justin O’Connor, Monash University
Party city: Urban cultural economy under state capitalism

18.50

DRINKS RECEPTION, sponsored by the International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR)
Clothworkers’ Centenary Concert Hall Lobby

20.30

DINNER
Shears Yard, 11-15 Wharf Street, Leeds City Centre
(not included in conference registration fee)

DAY 2 – Tuesday 8 September 2015

09.00 – 10.30

Panels 4

PANEL 4.1

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT1
Chair: Chris Paterson, University of Leeds

  1. Contradictions in the capitalism-objectivity nexus: Framing the HSBC tax evasion scandal
    Ibrahim Seaga Shaw, Northumbria University
  2. Covering capitalism: Shifting news narratives on economic crisis and austerity
    Laura Basu, Cardiff University
  3. Journalism facing the internet oligopoly: Google, Facebook and online publishers in France
    Nikos Smyrnaois, University of Toulouse
  4. Entrepreneurial journalism and the crisis of capitalist media
    Nicole Cohen, University of Toronto Mississauga

PANEL 4.2

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT2
Chair: Sarah Weston, University of Leeds

  1. Facebook stories: Feminist perspectives on alienation in digital media
    Kylie Jarrett, National University of Ireland Maynooth
  2. Narratives of cultural work: Subjectivity, capitalism and cultural labour
    Jonathan Ward, University of Kent
  3. Volunteering, marketisation and neoliberalism
    Jon Dean, Sheffield Hallam University
  4. Dystopia on trial: The ‘myth’ of the Heygate estate on Instagram.com
    Andrew Auld, University of Sussex

PANEL 4.3 CULTURAL RESISTANCE IN CULTURE-BASED CAPITALIST ECONOMY 2. THEORIZING CULTURE & RESISTANCE TO CAPITALISM IN URBAN STUDIES: SPACE, LAW, EXPERIMENTATION & CAPITALIST MORALISM

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT3
Chair: Liz Sterling, Leeds Beckett University

  1. Geneva: Squats and the development of an alternative cultural scene
    Mischa Piraud, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
  2. Urban cultural movements and alternative creative spaces
    Robert Hollands, Newcastle University
  3. Nightlife, experimentation and resistance of alternative culture in Geneva
    Marie-Avril Berthet, University of Leeds

10.30 – 11.00 Tea / Coffee break

11.00 – 12.30

Panels 5

PANEL 5.1

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT1
Chair: Luca Antoniazzi, University of Leeds

  1. Lynching rebranded: The killing of Michael Brown and the myth of the ‘demonic black man’ in the context of lethal police violence
    Will Nyerere, University of Manchester
  2. Post-punk’s (post-) colonialism: Gang of Four, funk, disco, and the asymmetries of musical hybridity
    Mimi Haddon, McGill University
  3. ‘Borrowed from the wind’: Copyright and traditional music
    Caspar Melville, University of London
  4. Autonomous publishing and the affordances of open-ness
    Stevphen Shukaikis, University of Essex

PANEL 5.2

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT2
Chair: Andreas Aurelio Rauh Ortega, University of Leeds

  1. Playing music, paying bills. Crisis, creative classes and musicians’ conditions of production in a global city
    Héctor Fouce, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
  2. Workers as capitalists? Some reflections on musicians as employers
    Martin Cloonan and John Williamson, University of Glasgow
  3. The production of gender-based content in the Pakistani television industry
    Munira Cheema, University of Sussex
  4. Co-producership of the state and creative work: Soviet filmmaking (1955-1985)
    Galina Gornostaeva, University of Westminster

PANEL 5.3

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT3
Chair: Nancy Thumim, University of Leeds

  1. Rising tides? Capital accumulation, reward monopolisation, and the perception of value in the digital music economy
    Leslie M. Meier, University of Leeds
    Vincent R. Manzerolle, University of Windsor
  2. Communication practices in the music industry: a critical perspective regarding digitalisation
    Stéphane Costantini, Université Paris 13
  3. “Reality television”: Between “trash” and “quality”
    Noa Lavie, Tel Aviv Jaffa Academic College
  4. The aesthetics of the on-air schedule in multi-platform public service television
    Hanne Bruun, Aarhus University

PANEL 5.4

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT4
Chair: Jason Cabañes, University of Leeds

  1. Religion and justice commodified: The case of the West Memphis Three
    Jennifer S. Carlberg, University of Leeds
  2. Disclosures of economic development and social transformation in culture practice: Maskanda music in post apartheid South Africa
    Kathryn Olsen, University of KwaZulu-Natal
  3. ‘The sound of Thatcherism on vinyl’: Spandau ballet and the early neo-liberal aspirations in popular culture
    Kari Kallioniemi, University of Turku

12.30 – 13.30 Lunch

13.30 – 15.00

Panels 6

PANEL 6.1

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT1
Chair: Giles Moss, University of Leeds

  1. Communication industries in North America after 20 years of NAFTA: media policy, regulatory bodies and concentration
    Rodrigo Gómez García, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana (UAM) Unidad Cuajimalpa
  2. Corporate libertarianism and the American media system
    Victor Pickard, University of Pennsylvania
  3. ‘The UK’s commercial public service broadcasters: Capitalism and regulation in the media system’
    Phil Ramsey, University of Nottingham Ningbo China

PANEL 6.2

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT2
Chair: Jennifer Carlberg, University of Leeds

  1. Bartering online: New media between counter-hegemonic and hypercapitalistic practices
    Giulia F. Airaghi, Catholic University of Milan
  2. Emotional capital and political engagement in cyber China from the case of ‘Malaysia Airlines flight 370’
    Yi Liu, University of Leeds
  3. The ideology of collaboration: A new vector for capitalism in the cultural industries and beyond?
    Jacob T. Matthews, Université Paris 8 Vincennes à St-Denis Cemti
  4. Crowdsourced patronage in contemporary creative economies
    Jonathan Karpetz, McGill University

PANEL 6.3

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT3
Chair: Anna Zoellner, University of Leeds

  1. It’s all about the money? Production cultural values and the spirit of capitalism in Danish independent television production
    Katrine Broe Sørensen, University of Aarhus
  2. From amateur activity to the domain of giants: An analysis of the Brazilian Pay TV market
    Denise Maria Moura da Silva Lopes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
  3. The commercialization of newspaper news production and its impact on journalism ethics in Kenya
    Jacinta Mwende Maweu,University of Nairobi
  4. Cultural production and the morality of markets: how pop music critics convert their economic power into symbolic capital
    Simone Varriale, University of Warwick

PANEL 6.4

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT4
Chair: Lee Edwards, University of Leeds

  1. Raymond Williams and social movements in network society
    Erika Ka-Yan Poon, Hong Kong Baptist University
  2. Digital activist inequality in the context of capitalist class structures
    Jen Schradie, Toulouse School of Economics
  3. Protest movements and their media practices: Desynchronization of political time and “machine time”
    Anne Kaun, Södertörn University
  4. Telecoms are not our enemies and other post-capital fairytales: new strategies for activism and analysis
    Evan Light, Concordia University

15.00 – 15.15 Tea / Coffee break

15.15 – 16.45

Panels 7

PANEL 7.1

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT1
Chair: Giles Moss, University of Leeds

  1. Capitalism and the digitalization of law
    Thomas Streeter, University of Vermont
  2. A capitalism that kills. Worker suicides, global economics and negation
    Sarah Waters, University of Leeds
  3. Marx (dis)likes Facebook: Social media between emancipation and commodification
    Thomas Allmer, University of Edinburgh

PANEL 7.2

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT2
Chair: Leslie Meier, University of Leeds

  1. Form-giving fire: Capitalist valorisation and the creative industries as Marx’s ‘work of combustion’
    Frederick H. Pitts, University of Bath
  2. At the intersection of commons and market: negotiations of value in open-source animation film production
    Julia Velkova, Södertörn University
    Peter Jakobsson, Södertörn University

PANEL 7.3 SOFT POWER, THE BRICS, AND WORLD CINEMAS

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT3
Chair: Paule Cooke, University of Leeds

  1. Brazil, cinema and soft power
    Stephanie Dennison, University of Leeds
    Alessandra Meleiro, Universidade Federal de São Carlos
  2. Bollywood’s soft power: Branding the nation, sustaining a meta-hegemony
    Ashvin Devasundaram, Heriot-Watt University
  3. Film as an instrument of China’s soft power
    Yanling Yang, University of Leeds
  4. South Africa, soft power and the competing agendas of the nation’s cultural policy
    Paul Cooke, University of Leeds

PANEL 7.4

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary LT4
Chair: Carly O’Neill, University of Leeds

  1. Creative labour, self-realization and commodification of the self
    Jeremy Joseph Vachet, University of Leeds
  2. The monetization of intimacy: The commodification of personal relationships on social media
    Cristina Miguel, University of Leeds
  3. Sounds like double shift: Entrepreneurship and commodification of musician’s labour in digital media
    Andreas Rauh, University of Leeds
  4. The commodification of morality; an exploration of the paradoxes created in the interaction of morality and consumer culture
    Carly O’Neill, University of Leeds

16.45 – 17.00 Tea / Coffee break

Plenary Three: Capitalism, Culture and the Media

17.00 – 18.20

ANTI-CAPITALISM AND ACTIVISM

Venue: Clothworkers’ Centenary Concert Hall
Chair: Leslie Meier, University of Leeds

Keynote 6
Des Freedman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Keynote 7
Jeremy Gilbert, University of East London

Keynote 8
Alison Hearn, University of Western Ontario

Plenary Speakers

All three speakers will address the plenary session theme in their own way.

PLENARY ONE. CAPITALISM, CULTURE, AND THE MEDIA

David Hesmondhalgh, University of Leeds

David Hesmondhalgh is Professor of Media, Music and Culture in the School of Media and Communication at the University of Leeds, where he was Head of School from 2010 to 2013. He is the author (with Kate Oakley, David Lee and Melissa Nisbett) of Culture, Economy and Politics: the Case of New Labour (Palgrave, 2015), Why Music Matters (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013), Creative Labour: Media Work in Three Cultural Industries (Routledge, 2011, co-written with Sarah Baker) and The Cultural Industries, now in its third edition (Sage, 2013). He is also editor or co-editor of seven books and journal special issues, including The Media and Social Theory (with Jason Toynbee, Routledge, 2008) and (with Anamik Saha) a special issue of the journal Popular Communication on “Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Production” (2013). In September 2014, he resigned from REF sub-panel 36 in protest at the REF and how it had been conducted

Bev Skeggs, Goldsmiths, University of London

Beverley Skeggs works in the department of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her main publications are The Media (1992), Feminist Cultural Theory (1995),Formations of Class and Gender,(1997), Transformations: Thinking Through Feminism (2000); Class, Self, Culture, (2004), Sexuality and the Politics of Violence and Safety (2004 with Les Moran),Feminism After Bourdieu, (2004 with Lisa Adkins),Reality TV and Class (2011) and Reacting to Reality Television: Audience, Performance,Value (2012) (both with Helen Wood). She is the co-editor of The Sociological Review and is currently an ESRC Professorial Fellow on a project on ‘A Sociology of Values and Value’.

Justin Lewis, Cardiff University

Justin Lewis is Professor of Communication at the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University. He has written many books about communication, the cultural industries, news and politics, including Constructing Public Opinion and Citizens or Consumers: The Media and the Decline of Political Participation. He is in the editorial board of nine journals and his latest book is Beyond Consumer Capitalism: Media and the Limits to Imagination will be published this autumn. He has led a number of research projects for the BBC, the BBC Trust, Channel 4, the Office of Science and Innovation, the AHRC, the ESRC and Rowntree.

PLENARY TWO. CAPITALISM, CULTURE AND THE MEDIA: INTERNATIONAL DIMENSIONS

Shakuntala Banaji, London School of Economics

Shakuntala Banaji is programme director for the MSc in Media, Communication and Development in the department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She lectures in development and communication, international media and world cinema. She has participated in several large cross-European projects on young people, new technologies, schooling and democratic participation between 2006 and 2014, with two new projects of participatory culture, active citizenship and youth starting in 2015, and has published widely on gender and politics in relation to South Asian media, Hindi cinema, audiences, creativity, news reception and online civic participation. Her publications include the monograph Reading Bollywood (Palgrave 2006/2011), a 2012 edited collection South Asian Media Cultures (Anthem Press); and The Civic Web: Young people, the Internet and Civic Participation (2013, jointly authored with David Buckingham). She is working on a new monograph about children, labour and media in India

Jason Cabañes, University of Leeds

Jason Cabañes is Lecturer in International Communication at the School of Media and Communication, University of Leeds. His current research focuses on exploring mediational approaches to understanding migration, multiculturalism, and politics. His works on these topics have been published in journals such as New Media and Society, Media, Culture and Society, and Southeast Asia Research. He has also recently led communication for social change research projects for The World Bank, World Press Photo, and The Press Freedom 2.0 Consortium.

Justin O’Connor, Monash University

Professor Justin O’Connor is Professor of Communications and Cultural Economy at Monash University (Melbourne, Australia) and visiting Chair, Department of Design and Media, Shanghai Jiaotong University. Until 2012 he was Professor in the Creative Industries Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. From 2006-8 he was Professor of Cultural Industries at the School of Performance and Cultural Industries, University of Leeds, and between 1995 and 2006 he was Director of Manchester Institute for Popular Culture at Manchester Metropolitan University.

PLENARY THREE. CAPITALISM, CULTURE AND THE MEDIA: ANTI-CAPITALISM AND ACTIVISM

Des Freedman, Goldsmiths, University of London

Des Freedman is Professor of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of The Contradictions of Media Power (2014), Misunderstanding the Internet (with James Curran and Natalie Fenton) (2012, new edition 2016) and The Politics of Media Policy (2008). He is secretary of Goldsmiths UCU and the current chair of the Media Reform Coalition.

Jeremy Gilbert, University of East London

Professor Jeremy Gilbert is a writer, researcher and activist whose work has appeared in various British, continental, American and Australian publications and has been translated into French, Spanish and German. His most recent book is Common Ground: Democracy and Collectivity in an Age of Individualism (Pluto 2013) and he has written widely on cultural theory, politics and music. His other books include Anticapitalism and Culture: Radical Theory and Popular Politics (2008). Jeremy was a founder organiser of both Signs of the Times and the London Social Forum, a convenor of the Radical Theory Forum at the European Social Forum, Paris in 2003 and London in 2004. He has been involved with many political and cultural projects inside and outside the academy, and has written with varying degrees of regularity for Open Democracy, Comment is Free, Soundings and Red Pepper. He is also a member of Lucky Cloud Sound System and sometimes plays records at Beauty and the Beat.

Alison Hearn, University of Western Ontario

Alison Hearn is an associate professor in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies, at the University of Western Ontario in Canada, and past president of her faculty union. Her research focuses on the intersections of promotional culture, new media, self-presentation, and emerging forms of labour and economic value. She also writes on the university as a cultural and political site. She has published widely in such journals as Continuum, Journal of Consumer Culture, Journal of Communication Inquiry, and Topia: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies, and in edited volumes including The Media and Social Theory, Blowing Up the Brand, and The Routledge Companion to Advertising and Promotional Culture. She is co-author, with Liora Salter, of Outside the Lines: Issues in Interdisciplinary Research (McGill-Queens University Press, 1997). Most recently, she co-edited a double issue of the European Journal of Cultural Studies (Volume 18: 4-5), entitled “Cultural Studies of Data Mining”,  and published a piece in International Studies in Organization and Management entitled “The Politics of Branding in the New University of Circulation”.

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